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  • The Stir City Piece now on View

    The Stir City Piece, 2016

    70,000 wooden coffee stir sticks woven in place and held by tension, 4,500 cardboard coffee cup sleeves stacked one inside another, 1,000 feet braided aluminum cable and ferrules, espresso and water.

    The Stir City Piece was a new commissioned site-specific installation for The Taubman Museum of Art. The work was part of the two person exhibition “Eye of the Needle” with artist Amanda McCavour. The installation was created as a response to the architecture and experience of the Museums iconic architecture. Installation was completed over the course of 8 days on site.

    From the Curator Amy Morefield:

    Using the gallery as a studio space, Brilliant often refers to his site responsive installations, as“drawings in space”as the repetitive process of weaving over 70,000 stirrers is similar to the mark-making gesture known as crosshatch. Additionally, the stacked coffee sleeves that meander through the gallery and held by tension wires give the effect of a lines floating in space. Viewers are encouraged navigate the installation and with the addition of a espresso grounds wall drawing, providing the pungent aromatic fragrance of your favorite coffee shop, it becomes a fully sensory experience. As Brilliant aptly comments “ No prior knowledge is assumed or required” to enjoy The Stir City Piece.